Origins of the Rapture

The concept of the Rapture, which is the belief that believers in Jesus Christ will be taken up into heaven before a period of tribulation on Earth, is not found in the Bible. The belief in the Rapture is based on a specific interpretation of certain passages in the New Testament, particularly the letters of Paul and the Book of Revelation.

The idea of the Rapture can be traced back to a 17th-century French theologian named Jean Darby, who developed the concept based on his reading of the Bible. Darby’s ideas were later popularized in the United States in the 19th century by a man named John Nelson Darby, who was a member of a group called the Plymouth Brethren. Darby’s ideas about the Rapture were widely disseminated through the writings of a woman named Margaret McDonald, who claimed to have received a revelation about the end times.

The belief in the Rapture became more widespread in the 20th century, particularly through the influence of Hal Lindsey’s 1970 book “The Late, Great Planet Earth,” which popularized a number of end-times prophecies and became a bestseller. Today, the Rapture is a central belief of many Christian denominations and is often associated with the belief in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.

Jean Darby (also known as John Darby) was a 17th-century French theologian who is credited with developing the concept of the Rapture, the belief that believers in Jesus Christ will be taken up into heaven before a period of tribulation on Earth. Darby was a member of the Plymouth Brethren, a group of Christians who emphasized the importance of the Bible and the second coming of Jesus Christ. He developed his ideas about the Rapture based on his interpretation of certain passages in the New Testament, particularly the letters of Paul and the Book of Revelation. Darby’s ideas about the Rapture were later popularized in the United States in the 19th century through the writings of a man named John Nelson Darby, who was also a member of the Plymouth Brethren.

John Nelson Darby (1800-1882) was an influential figure in the development of the modern concept of the Rapture, the belief that believers in Jesus Christ will be taken up into heaven before a period of tribulation on Earth. Darby was born in London, England, and was educated at Oxford University. He was a member of the Plymouth Brethren, a group of Christians who emphasized the importance of the Bible and the second coming of Jesus Christ. Darby was an ordained minister and traveled widely, preaching and teaching about his beliefs. He was known for his strong views and was often in conflict with other members of the Plymouth Brethren. Despite this, he had a significant influence on the development of modern evangelical Christianity and his ideas about the Rapture continue to be held by many people today.

Margaret McDonald (1815-1840) was a young Scottish woman who claimed to have received a revelation about the end times and the Rapture, the belief that believers in Jesus Christ will be taken up into heaven before a period of tribulation on Earth. McDonald’s revelation was influential in the development of the modern concept of the Rapture and was widely disseminated through the writings of John Nelson Darby, a member of the Plymouth Brethren. According to McDonald, she received her revelation in 1830, when she was just 15 years old. In her revelation, she described a “rapture” of believers that would take place before a time of great tribulation on Earth. McDonald’s revelation was controversial and was rejected by some members of the Plymouth Brethren, but it had a lasting impact on the development of modern evangelical Christianity.

The belief in the Rapture, which is the belief that believers in Jesus Christ will be taken up into heaven before a period of tribulation on Earth, is not held by all Christian denominations. Some churches and Christian groups that do not hold to this belief include:

  • The Roman Catholic Church: The official teachings of the Roman Catholic Church do not include the belief in the Rapture.
  • The Eastern Orthodox Church: The Eastern Orthodox Church does not teach the belief in the Rapture.
  • The Church of the Nazarene: The Church of the Nazarene, a mainline Protestant denomination, does not hold to the belief in the Rapture.
  • The Quakers: The Religious Society of Friends, also known as the Quakers, do not believe in the Rapture.

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This is How Jesus Was Born

An Angel Comes to Joseph
18 This was how Jesus, God’s Anointed One, was born.
His mother, Mary, had promised Joseph to be his wife, but while she was still a virgin she became pregnant through the power of the Holy Spirit. 19 Her fiancé, Joseph, was a righteous man full of integrity and he didn’t want to disgrace her, but when he learned of her pregnancy he secretly planned to break the engagement. 20 While he was still debating with himself about what to do, he fell asleep and had a supernatural dream. An angel from the Lord appeared to him in clear light and said, “Joseph, descendant of David, don’t hesitate to take Mary into your home as your wife, because the power of the Holy Spirit has conceived a child in her womb. 21 She will give birth to a son and you are to name him ‘Savior,’ for he is destined to give his life to save his people from their sins.”
22 This happened so that what the Lord spoke through his prophet would come true:
23 Listen! A virgin will be pregnant,


she will give birth to a Son,
and he will be known as “Emmanuel,”
which means in Hebrew,
“God became one of us.”
24 When Joseph awoke from his dream, he did all that the angel of the Lord instructed him to do. He took Mary to be his wife, 25 but they refrained from having sex until she gave birth to her son, whom they named “Jesus.” Matthew 1:18-25

Heart of Giving

Treasures in Heaven
19 “Don’t keep hoarding for yourselves earthly treasures that can be stolen by thieves. Material wealth eventually rusts, decays, and loses its value. 20 Instead, stockpile heavenly treasures for yourselves that cannot be stolen and will never rust, decay, or lose their value. 21 For your heart will always pursue what you esteem as your treasure.
22 “The eyes of your spirit allow revelation-light to enter into your being. If your heart is unclouded, the light floods in! 23 But if your eyes are focused on money, the light cannot penetrate and darkness takes its place. How profound will be the darkness within you if the light of truth cannot enter!
24 “How could you worship two gods at the same time? You will have to hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You can’t worship the true God while enslaved to the god of money!” Matthew 6:19-24

Shalom

His Peace
 
Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. 7 And the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.
8 Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good repute, if there is any excellence and if anything worthy of praise, dwell on these things. 9 The things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you. Philippians 4:6-9

Definition of Shalom in Hebrew
The root word of Shalom is “shalam”. One of the first uses of the word shalam in the Torah is in Exodus 21 and 22. In these 2 chapters, it is used 14 times.
Moses is giving instructions to the people about what to do when someone causes material loss or in the case of theft of property. When that loss or injury occurs, the owner is considered lacking or not complete. The one responsible was to make things right.
In the translation of Exodus 21-22, shalam is translated as “make it good”, “shall surely pay”, “make full restitution” or to “restore”. The ancient Hebrew meaning of shalam was “to make something whole”. Not just regarding practical restoration of things that were lost or stolen. But with an overall sense of fulness and completeness in mind, body and estate.
Wholeness and Well-being
This meaning of wholeness carries over into the word Shalom. In Genesis 43:27-28, Joseph, still unrecognized by his brothers, is asking about their health and his father’s health.
“Then he asked them about their well-being, and said, “Is your father well, the old man of whom you spoke? Is he still alive?” And they answered, “Your servant our father is in good health; he is still alive.” (NKJV Gen 43:27-28)
In Hebrew, the word translated as “well-being”, “well”, and “in good health” is all one word – Shalom.
17 And the work of righteousness will be peace,
And the service of righteousness, quietness and confidence forever.
18 Then my people will live in a peaceful habitation,
And in secure dwellings and in undisturbed resting places;
19 And it will hail when the forest comes down,
And the city will be utterly laid low.
20 How blessed will you be, you who sow beside all waters,
Who let out freely the ox and the donkey. Isaiah 32:17-20

“The steadfast of mind You will keep in perfect peace,
Because he trusts in You.
4 “Trust in the LORD forever,
For in GOD the LORD, we have an everlasting Rock. Isaiah 26:3-4

Perfect, absolute peace surrounds those
whose imaginations are consumed with you;
they confidently trust in you.
4 Yes, trust in the Lord Yahweh forever and ever!
For Yah, the Lord God, is your Rock of Ages! Isaiah 26:3-4